REVITALISE HOGARTH

Join us in asking the London Assembly to provide space for cycling on the A4 and A316 roads, and particularly at Hogarth Roundabout.

We are asking for continuous protected cycle lanes on A4 and A316, straight-forwardly linked at Hogarth Roundabout

Please email the London Assembly

In your email you can mention:

  • The need for a safe way to cross Burlington Lane
  • The need for a continuous cycle route around Hogarth Roundabout
  • The current hazards encountered at Hogarth Roundabout and Burlington Lane
  • The need for safe routes to Chiswick Schools
  • Your views on the need for protected cycle lanes along the A4 and A316
Email Assembly Member: Murad Qureshi

 

Email Assembly Member: Caroline Pidgeon

 

Alternatively enter your postcode below and find all the London Assembly members that represent you.

Contact The London Assembly
Enter your Postcode below:



Safer routes for cycling would increase active travel and reduce obesity. People need to cycle along main roads to get to schools and to get to work. The characteristics that make main roads ideal for general transport – directness and legibility – are as true for cycling as for any other mode of street transport. Without protected cycle lanes, main roads are intimidating and unsafe. By making cycling short local journeys attractive over using a car, air pollution can also be cut.

 


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Comments

REVITALISE HOGARTH — 1 Comment

  1. Once again though, if those are pedestrianised traffic lights, a cycle and pedestrian way is having to ask for permission to cross the road.

    There should be no need for pedestrianised traffic lights if the red of the cycle way was continued over the road with motorised vehicles always having to give way to pedestrians and cyclists.

    Putting motorised traffic before pedestrians and cyclists has to stop if there are to become less deaths and injuries on our roads.

    It seems to me that the UK is learning nothing from countries that are far more advanced than us when it comes to building real safe pedestrian and cycling infrastructure.

    Almost getting it right isn’t getting it right.

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